What happens in New Mexico should stay…

Please understand that what is meant in this writing is both of a personal perspective as well as a professional one.

Through the next several days we will be posting a series of articles that we feel we are duty bound to do. In fact, for the greater sense of survival and civility in the United States we also feel that it is only fair to bring in two other  factors: Illegal immigration and Medical costs by taxpayers. We’ll start with asking a simple question:

Since when does a state constitution ever trump the U.S. Constitution?  Our other question is when does the “alleged discriminatory” concerns trump those guaranteed rights that are protected under the U.S. Constitution?  NEVER!

I ran into a blog last night and all I could think to do was first, plug the blog and her writing, and perhaps if appropriate, quote her. At any rate share this with us and you make your decision.

The blog is called Prometheus Unbound and is easily found by clicking on the link or searching for it. The author’s name is Santi Tafarella and here is how she started:

up-quote-blueI am a strong supporter of gay marriage, but I think that the below story is an outrageous violation, by authorities in New Mexico, of conscientious religious objection.

Most of you who frequent this site, American Age, know what passion we hold for Jon and Elaine Huguenin and the miserable load they’ve been carrying around simply because their guaranteed rights to protection, equal rights, and religious liberties have all but been badly violated. Therefore, we found Ms. Tafarella’s article quite inspiring.

According to the Associated Press this weekend:

A professional photographer who refused to take pictures of a gay couple’s commitment ceremony because of her religious beliefs violated New Mexico discrimination law, a human rights panel ruled. Vanessa Willock filed a complaint with the New Mexico Human Rights Commission in 2006, contending that Albuquerque photographer Elaine Huguenin told her she photographed only traditional marriages. Huguenin and her husband, Jon, own Elane Photography.

And the commision’s reasoning for its ruling? Again, according to AP:

The commission viewed Huguenin’s business as a public accommodation, similar to a restaurant or a store.

A lower court has sided with the commission, generating an appeals process. I hope, as a gay marriage supporter, that this commission’s infringement on the conscience of a photographer is quickly overturned. It is not good for the gay rights movement to be seen as forcing religious people to participate in gay gatherings or civil union ceremonies, and it is not good for civil liberties and the protection of conscience.

The right to non-participation and conscientious objection must be vigilantly safeguarded in a free society. It is one thing to tell religious people that they must not interfere with the freedoms and equal treatment of gay people under the law, but it is another thing entirely to force religious people to associate themselves with activities or functions that they regard as morally objectionable. Hopefully the State would never step in and require religious photographers to participate in a pornography convention or an atheist convention against their will, and so the State should likewise not be forcing photographers to participate in gay gatherings against their will. (Simply brilliant!)

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