Strict enforcement is the most humane

Who is this helping?

Who is this helping?

Last week we wrote two articles that espoused various advocacy groups lobbying to get Haitians ‘special protected status’ primarily on the concern for what Haiti has gone through in the last several years.
Recently three illegal migrants were in a Florida hospital, one in critical condition, after a raft carrying some 30 people capsized off the coast of Florida. Sixteen people were rescued, and the rest are presumed dead. The United States Coast Guard has also conducted a search for other survivors over 2,500 square miles of ocean. Autopsies of the recovered bodies were to be conducted.
The United States already allows in a generous number of immigrants and temporary workers each year. In a typical year, we grant more than 1 million green cards per year, 84% of those to non-white persons. We typically issue more than 500,000 work visas per year. But as the raft tragedy shows, people still are coming here illegally.
Strict enforcement of our immigration laws is the way to prevent such tragedies because there are no jobs here for the people on the raft, and helping them in Haiti is more cost-effective and leads to the long-term solution of a Haiti that creates jobs for its people. Strict enforcement of the law, both on our borders and in the interior of our country, should deter attempts at illegal entry and minimize the number of incidents. This means sending the survivors of the raft tragedy back. It is actually the more humane thing to do. If we let them stay, word will get back to Haiti, and it will induce more dangerous attempts.
There will be, no doubt, a vocal group of people who want these survivors to be granted legal status in the United States on humanitarian grounds. They see a group of needy people and want to open our doors to them. But what about ‘them’ over and over until 100 million times over?
No joke folks more than three billion people in the world live on less than $2.50 per day. If you allow this group of 30 to stay, you are sending the message to 100 million other rafts that if you can get here; you can stay, for a total of three billion people.capsized immigrant boat
The situation in Haiti is heartbreaking. If more aid is needed, the United States could supply it. We could also help them build the institutions they need to have an economy that will provide jobs and sustenance to their population. It is much cheaper to help people in their own country where individuals can be supported for pennies a day.
But we stress that the goal should not be to support them; it should be to help them develop their economy so they can support themselves. Probably the only way the problems of Haiti are ever going to be solved is if we provide backstop support so that the Haitian people can solve them themselves.
To prevent the loss of life that occurs when people try to sneak into the United States, we need strict enforcement of our immigration laws both at the border and in the interior of our country so that people be deterred from the attempt. Strict enforcement is what will save their lives and preserve our jobs at decent wages. It is the most humane policy for them and for us to do.
tophat_2Hat-tip to Charles Breiterman, who was the inspiration for this story, published at Numbersusa and as we’ve mentioned here before, one should pay them a spell-binging experience.

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