Celebrity v. Stardom v. Fame, trois

What is a Celebrity?

What is a Celebrity?

We originally thought that this small series would only be three parts; however, much to our pleasure and concern, we find that it is going to be just a bit more that what we initially planned. In one way it’s a good thing; yet, on the other hand it’s troubling.
We know, we know…we promised to move on to fame and its qualifications, categories, and degrees. Although we want too we find that now is not the appropriate time insofar as America’s fixation with celebrities or better yet, people who have appeared in film, television, or other mediums of recognition is still too under developed for us to move on with good conscience.
In fact we believe that it indeed may be the industry that creates the ‘celeb’ rather than anything the person may have done. We, as you know, have written rather extensively on the notion of “manufactured celebrity” and we believe that the marketing machines in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago as well as the representative agencies may be the greatest significant factor in how a person achieves ‘celeb status.’
Most real, and we mean r-e-a-l celebrities are those folks who have trained whilst most of the time they’ve multi-crossed trained to become – or develop the special skills they possess. We have examples that illustrate this very easily. Has anyone ever noticed how a British actor can influence a particular scene – almost to the point of manipulation with just their eyes – almost within the realm of being off camera?
British actors or most of them are staged trained far before ever considering a career in film or television. We mean seriously, watch a British actor, even an Australian actor whilst on-screen; it is definitely their presence that is so powerful. Why do you think Gary Oldman was chosen to play Sirius Black in the Harry Potter series? Just look at Hugh Jackman as ‘Logan’ or ‘Wolverine’ in the X-Men franchise; or about the late Heath Ledger in The Dark Knight?
Our reference is not that Brit’s or Aussie’s are any better than are Americans. We do however believe that if an American performer wants to rise to the top of their field; albeit, film, television, music, or otherwise then one will have to train in all aspects of their given choice. It was a while back that I read An Actor Prepares by Stanislavski, who most refer to as ‘the father of modern theater’ and definitely the author and perfector of the process known as ‘Method Acting.’ In An Actor Prepares the author clearly establishes that fencing, dancing, and emotional memory are some of the most important skills a good actor should acquire.
As far as music is concerned, as well as art, these disciplines need practice, training, mentoring, and then more practicing. All of the great musicians throughout time have paid their dues so to speak insofar as one does not pick up an instrument and become a celebrity. Even here there are exceptions such as the Partridge Family, the Monkees, or just about anyone seen on television that has attained ‘celebrity status’ without even a hit record.
Several of us here at American Age are syndicated writers – some have attained celeb status; others, would just as soon be the person with the notepad or tape recorder. And then some of us have very well-known family members and/or famous great grandparents – but does any of that make us a celebrity? No.
American people or even those who live in America have a fixation with wannabe stars, celebrities—if even for a minute, or just about anyone famous. Why do you suppose that is? And here is one fact that we will definitely be addressing much sooner than later…
It seems that a whole host of “celebrities” now have Twitter accounts. Why? Most likely to keep their flame from extinguishing; moreover, these folks will write messages for themselves and their friends (in show business) to add them as or too “follow” them. Is there like a status that goes along with how many people ‘follow’ you? Who knows? What we – every writer on staff here – have asked a question (politely, professionally, and respectfully) and for most of us, none of the “celebs” has ever offered so much as a ‘Hello’ or a legitimate answer to our questions. So what’s up with that? Go figure! It’s just bad form. . .
 
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