Political correctness in the military part 2

Political correctness in the military

Earlier this month we presented an article that espoused the notion as to whether “political correctness” may have had a direct result on the travesty at Fort Hood. We quite openly believe that if a person is acting out with their ideological beliefs and is conflicted about what he believes as opposed to what he does, sure – there can be a real problem.
However the point of our previous article as well as this one is to illustrate how gaining “protected status” under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment – has reached a point where it simply is not assisting those who need protection in this country. (Please see previous articles by clicking here.)
Sixty-three percent (63%) of U.S. voters say political correctness prevented the military from responding to warning signs from Major Nidal Malik Hasan that could have prevented the Fort Hood shootings from taking place.
A new Rasmussen Reports national survey shows that just 16% disagree and do not believe political correctness kept military authorities from possibly stopping the killing of 13 people and the wounding of many others in the November 5 incident. Twenty-one percent (21%) are not sure.
Older Americans are more suspicious of political correctness than voters under 40. Republicans and voters not affiliated with either major political party overwhelmingly believe political correctness held the military back. That view is shared by 49% of Democrats while 23% of those in the president’s party disagree to think political correctness kept the military from responding to warning signs from Hasan.
Seventy-five percent (75%) of Mainstream Americans think political correctness prevented the military from responding before the attacks took place.
New reports say authorities were aware of suspicious behavior and comments by Hasan, a devout Muslim, but no action was taken against him, in part because of concern that there might be an appearance of anti-Islamic bias. Both President Obama and the Army chief of staff urged Americans not to jump to conclusions about the cause of the shootings just after they took place.
Seventy-three percent (73%) of Texas voters say Hasan should receive the death penalty if he is convicted of the massacre at Fort Hood. Military prosecutors have charged Hasan with 13 counts of premeditated murder. If convicted, he is eligible for the death penalty. Quick question: Why do you suppose that voters over the age of 40 are more suspicious of political correctness?
 
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