The DREAM Act and the Unthankful…

We just wanted to put together a small article for our readers today; at least for the early session. It is going to address three distinct topics and we of course will leave the discussion up to you. But you know, it is more than that – anymore these days it seems as though the poker pot is bigger, ostensibly we are negotiating much, much more.

We are going to take a look at the anchor baby phenomenon that is perhaps the most archaic legislation this country has ever known. Then we would like an opportunity to look at the DREAM Act a pending piece of legislation that looks to assist even more those anchor babies and those who were brought to the United States in an act of either desperation or pure stupidity. And finally we’d entertain looking at Comprehensive Immigration Reform.

Where else in the civilized world can a person of any lineage, heritage, or otherwise by happenstance be in the United States at eight and a half months pregnant when that day comes! It’s time to have the baby! And depending on all things being equal, little Junior comes into the world – not of the citizenship where Junior’s parents are from, or even where all of Junior’s relatives come from as well. What? Someone, anyone, please tell me you’re kidding me!

Oh we hate to be the bearers of bad news, but here are all of the developed nations of the world that offer birthright citizenship to babies of tourists and illegal aliens:

United States of America

That’s right; every other modern “Developed nation” in the world has gotten rid of birthright citizenship policies. Yet, most of U.S. news media and politicians the last two weeks have ridiculed the comments by some other politicians that it is time for the U.S. to put an end to birthright citizenship for tourists and illegal aliens. What do you think?

Canada was the last non-U.S. holdout. Illegal aliens stopped getting citizenship for their babies in 2009; Australia’s birthright citizenship requirements are much more stringent than those of H.R. 1868 and took effect in 2007. New Zealand repealed in 2006; Ireland repealed in 2005; France repealed in 1993; India repealed in 1987; United Kingdom repealed in 1983; Portugal repealed in 1981 and that ladies and gentlemen leaves the United States the only remaining nation that entitles people citizenship.

The DREAM Act Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act (The “DREAM Act”) is a piece of proposed federal legislation in the United States that was introduced in the United States Senate, and the United States House of Representatives on March 26, 2009. This bill would provide certain illegal immigrant students who graduate from US high schools, who are of good moral character, arrived in the U.S. as minors, and have been in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill’s enactment, the opportunity to earn conditional permanent residency. (Whoa! Sounds great to us!)

Within the six year period, a qualified student must have “acquired a degree from an institution of higher education in the United States or [have] completed at least 2 years, in good standing, in a program for a bachelor’s degree or higher degree in the United States,” or have “served in the uniformed services for at least 2 years and, if discharged, [have] received an honorable discharge.”

This is where we run into a bit of trouble: Earlier today we ran into an advocacy group’s website where we were treated to this opening paragraph about the DREAM Act:

“The DREAM Act is not without its controversy and some of it understandable. Here at Vivir Latino we have written for years about the complex nature of the bill, especially objections to the military component and how sometimes it is used by politicos and orgs on all sides to promote the good vs. bad immigrant narrative that we find offensive and counterproductive to moving towards justice for all immigrants.” (Emphasis added)

Does “good moral character” have anything to do with facing reality? How about serving those who have served you? Here we see that some illegal aliens are having difficulty with the military clause of the DREAM Act. We firmly believe that if there were less demanding by aliens, less protesting, less advocacy groups – including special interest groups – less enabling, less empowering, and less entitlements just about everyone in this country would have no problem with Comprehensive Immigration Reform.

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