Understanding America

Understanding the processes that America has gone through from the first settlement and subsequent waves of migration and evolving into what she is today we believe – that a person who endeavors to live here – should know the various stages, and the history of how, what, and why America exists as she does.

The United States of America is a Judeo-Christian majority nation. Furthermore, through our research, articles, and other writings we have proven beyond any reasonable doubt that during the time of original settlement and especially over the next 100 years the United States remained Judeo-Christian. It is extremely important to understand the situation where primarily within the original thirteen colonies the Founders and subsequent Framer’s of the U.S. Constitution did so under the auspices of Judeo-Christian social mores.

We will be spending time analyzing, examining, and assessing how and why some Americans feel about some issues. Make no mistake these writings are for informational purposes only insofar as they are truly the pages of an unpublished book in progress. As such, there is no intention on behalf of this site or its staff to speak for anyone. We are just passing on information.

Please make no mistake about this posture: This exposé is not a “we versus them” set of directions. Furthermore, we would cherish the notion that whatever a person’s belief system may be, it is important to us that it is understood that we respect, honor, and admire you and yours for having a system of beliefs.

One very significant issue we intend on addressing is birthright citizenship and why some Americans are uncomfortable with current legislation. Another issue we will address the fact that America was established and subsequently framed as a Judeo-Christian social structure.

We need to start from the beginning, otherwise how would anyone be able to discern the meaning of various positions and the like. Therefore let’s start with the very first Charter issued to (what would later become an American colony) Virginia in 1606 – and provided the colonists and their descendants were to “…have and enjoy all liberties, franchises, and immunities…as if they had been abiding and born, within this our Realm of England…”

That fact – that these were British colonies – is vitally important to understand and remember in thinking about the Bill of Rights. Significant to the British Empire, unlike earlier competitors in Spain, France, Portuguese, and others was the notion that legal traditions remained the same from the mother country to the colony. Therefore, it is important to understand that when an English man, women, or family migrated to America with all their worldly goods packed and stowed away this included the basic concepts of English law and liberty.

As the colonies grew so did the need for a proper government. The premise that civility and the manner of laws are written in such a fashion that any citizen should never be deprived of their human, natural, or civil rights. Briefly, this is what the various conventions were for insofar as those people who were “framing” the actual rules, policies, and laws needed common ground; in addition, they needed consensus from those who were to become part of this nation.

This is the end of our first part of “Understanding America.”

 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: