When it comes to Immigration Reform…Hispanics should not believe Obama

Currently, the United States and Canada are the only developed nations that grant automatic citizenship to almost all children born within their borders, regardless of whether the parents are citizens, legal residents, temporary visitors, or illegal aliens in the country. The Pew Hispanic Center estimates that eight percent of all U.S. births (350,000/year) come from at least one illegal-alien parent.

Legislation to end birthright citizenship was introduced earlier this year by Representative Steve King of Iowa. The Birthright Citizenship Act (H.R. 140), would amend the Immigration and Nationality Act – not the Constitution – to consider a person born in the United States “subject to the jurisdiction” of the United States for citizenship at birth purposes if the person is born in the United States of parents, one of whom is: (1) a U.S. citizen or national; (2) a lawful permanent resident alien whose residence is in the United States; or (3) an alien performing active service in the U.S. Armed Forces.

H.R. 140 was referred to the House Judiciary Committee on January 24, 2011

As Deportations Hit Record Highs, Latinos Oppose Obama’s Policy

By a ratio of more than two-to-one, Latinos disapprove of the way the Obama administration is handling deportations of unauthorized immigrants, according to a new national survey of Latino adults. The survey also reveals that heading into the 2012 presidential campaign, Obama and the Democratic Party continue to enjoy strong support from Latino registered voters, despite a decline in Obama’s job approval rating.

As of March 2010, 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants were living in the United States, virtually unchanged from a year earlier, according to new estimates from the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center. This stability in 2010 follows a two-year decline from the peak of 12 million in 2007 to 11.1 million in 2009 that was the first significant reversal in a two-decade pattern of growth.

The number of unauthorized immigrants in the nation’s workforce, 8 million in March 2010, also did not differ from the Pew Hispanic Center estimate for 2009. As with the population total, the number of unauthorized immigrants in the labor force had decreased in 2009 from its peak of 8.4 million in 2007. They made up 5.2% of the labor force in 2010. And if you are not confused by now, then re-read what who’s alleging. One cannot have record high deportation levels whilst the numbers are not changing.

The number of children born to at least one unauthorized-immigrant parent in 2009 was 350,000 and they made up 8% of all U.S. births, essentially the same as a year earlier. An analysis of the year of entry of unauthorized immigrants who became parents in 2009 indicates that 61% arrived in the U.S. before 2004, 30% arrived from 2004 to 2007, and 9% arrived from 2008 to 2010.

In contrast to the national trend, the number of unauthorized immigrants has grown in some West South Central states. From 2007 to 2010, there was a statistically significant increase in the combined unauthorized immigrant population of Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. The change was not statistically significant for these states individually, but it was for the combined three states. Texas has the second largest number of unauthorized immigrants, trailing only California.

Despite the recent decline and leveling off, the number of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States has tripled since 1990, when it was 3.5 million. The size of this population grew by a third since 2000, when was 8.4 million. It is reports such as these, showing that the illegal immigration problem in the U.S. is so far off the mark, Pew Research is Top Drawer, while the Obama Administration has done nothing and will continue to do nothing to resolve this issue.

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