Islamophobia, causing identity crises and need for children to find themselves..?

Islamophobia, causing identity crises and need for children to find themselves..?

ISIS-childrens-training-campLate this evening I happened upon an article written by Rys Farthing, at Oxford University in the British newspaper, The Mirror, the article was titled, ‘ISIS wouldn’t be here if there wasn’t Islamophobia’: What young British Muslims think about radicalization.

There is rarely a day that passes that very similar thoughts cross my mind. However, it’s important to note that I am an outsider — meaning I’m not Muslim; furthermore, I have a very difficult time trying to absorb the entire meaning of it all.

I find it difficult to try and put anyone through a culture shock that I believe is happening to the wayward younger boys and girls in London, England as well as some who have left the U.S. to lock arm in arm with the radical side of a praxis gone array.

There is this notion I get when I hear the words “Islam” and “Muslim.” For some reason it’s very difficult for me to see what one has to do with the other. Now as far as school aged boys and girls are concerned I understand their dilemma; albeit, given their ages as well as the understanding of their parents, for me it resembles one single spark in the night.

A lot of today’s youth lack identity, and the most vulnerable are being drawn into extremism. Whether that be ISIS or the EDL, the reasons for joining seem to be similar. While the numbers of young people leaving are, thankfully, few in number, I’m still struck by the scale of the presence of ISIS and radicalization surrounding these young people’s lives.

“They’re targeting everyone now. If you’re on Twitter and following some Islamic thing, [ISIS] try for you as well.” It’s all over their social mediaISIS-childrens-training-camp2 feeds and they all know, or know of, peers who’ve gone.

As for me I’m definitely concerned about “following some Islamic thing…” This is a sobering notion; subsequently, reading an outcry for help, it is profoundly seen here talking with seven or eight school girls roughly in America would be freshmen or sophomores in high school whilst on the other hand in England they are most likely first or second form in class categorization.

The original author as well as the girls seem to be thinking that this conundrum that the girls find themselves in is an identity crisis. A sudden change in the course of a disease or fever, toward either improvement or deterioration is one definition of “crisis” whilst I think the next definition is far more useable — An emotionally stressful event or a traumatic change in one’s life.

The idea that the girls were born in England does not seem very likely. Therefore, that would land them into an immigrant status. I feel as long as someone continues to grasp or cling at something that in and of itself is contradictory the very least one could hope for these girls is confusion or the sense of unknowing. Now then, this is not extraordinary to a person in their teens when we are all out there trying to find our niche in society. It is okay to ask oneself, “who am I?” Or even discussing it with parents (highly unlikely) better may be a friend to assist in the proper accommodation of ideas.

If there is any one particular issue that thrusts out at me — is that some real “come to Muhammad” organizing needs to be completed. I use come to Muhammad in the very same sense that Christians often say “come to Jesus” meeting.

victorian_line

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